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Full text of "The annuary"

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THE TRIBUNE PRINT 
WALNUT GROVE. MO. 



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VOL. I. 

^lublishcft b^i the 
Hnlnni (Sintoe, J3n. 

1915. 

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DEDICATION 



T ° 

PAUL E. ANDREW, ' 

Our worthy superintendent, who has won 
the respect and love of the student body by 

□ patience and kindness to his students, by "n 

untiring- energy in his work and by ceaseless LI 

devotion to the welfare of our school, we 
gratefully dedicate this annual. 



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BOARD OF EDUCATION 




M. D. Wright W. H. Jones J. S. Whitaker 

W. A. McMehen W. A. McGuire A. A. Chauncey 



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P. E. ANDREW 
Sc. B. Drury 1911; B. Pd. Springfield Normal 1914. 



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Get me, this fellow is some scientist. For instance, his course n| 

in Chemistry began before he was out of the toddling- age. To |J 

hear him rattle off jaw-breaking- formulae reminds you of a second 
Hiedenhain or Abderhalden. Why, the oxidation of carbon 
disulphide and its relation to the agricultural subject of moles is as 
easy as eating Chilli to him. Chemistry is only a start. His 
knowledgs of the topography of Graydon Springs would waste j J 

printer's ink if it were tabulated. He can tell you how Mother 
Earth adjusts her skin; why Vesuvius spits her fiery liquid and 
why Shasta's coat is white; why cities stand on their heads in 
deserts and seas. 

With his overalls and jumper and brogan shoes he makes some j ] 

farmer, for under his mask lies hidden sacks of knowledge of bugs, 
beans, beasts, beetles and bees. A mite on a hen or a scale on a 
tree startle his imagination, believe me. He diagnosed and cured 
_ six sick soil cases in so many days more or less. 

But in summary, if you wish to know how he bums his time in 
school just study the following sentence and the Golden Rule: 
The diagonals of a circular field intersect at a mineral spring where 
a farmer is studying intently the effects of the water on the grow- 

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W. E. SMITH 

Specialized in History, Economics and 
Mathematics in Warrensburg and Spring- 
field Normals. 



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Smith, common name that, but take it from me Socrates, his 

□ bean is most unusual. That little noodle which is hooked to the i 

cephalic terminus of his spinal boneyard contains more tabulated, ' 

correlated, annotated historical stuff than was ever sardined in the 
think tank of the Hon. John Clark Pidrath. Take it from me 
Spirit of Napoleon, he knows just how you got balled up at Wat- 

Oerloo. He is sure wise to your blunders. He's got Thomas E. n 

Watson outclassed and pushed clear off the board when it comes to LI 

puttin' out the dope about how Wellington hipped you. And get 
me on this, Boney, had this young spirit of Mars been there in 
place of his noble Unk Kafightsky that St. Helena frost would 
never harmed your alfalfa. Believe me, Bo, he's had his hooks 
and lamps on everything in Clio's almanac. Honest, Pal, there's LI 

no ruff stuff about this I'm handin' you. Joseph Smith didn't 
know half as much about wives as William Ernest knows about 
the capers of man. 

Oh yes, Caroline, you know they reel it off to us about Euclid 
being the papa of geometry. Well, if this Smith with the William j [ 

Ernest handle had lived back in Mr. Euclid's time, Mr. Euclid 
would have one less honor. Pythagoras made an awful fuss about 
that "square on the hypotenuse" business you know. This little 
knowledge bump knows thirteen ways to prove the same thing 
but he is just as calm as if he expects always to be a bachelor. I j 



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MRS. P. E. ANDREW 
B. Pd. Springfield Normal '10. 



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This woman speaks the dead tongue as well as Riley does 
Hoosier lingo. Meet her thrice and if you dont say "Salve" the 
next time it wont be her fault. Mark you Antony! she can talk 
for days on how Caesar fought the German bipeds. Cicero is as 
familiar to her as a shamrock is to an Irishman. Primis Annus in 
the Latin lingoism is as approachable by a Freshy as Montessorism 
is to a tot when she is the pedagogue. Sojourn in her class for a 
few days and you will hear things your knowledge to fatten. 

Webster appears in the veil of a woman when she surmounts 
Bunker Hill and begins on "Venerable Man." If old Pat Henry 
could see her stamp her foot, raise her hand, and cry, "Give me 
Latin or give me English" he would "Never again" be able to 
hear the clanking of steel on the Boston plain. To follow her in 
spirit is to be a "barefoot boy ' helping his father revive a "Deserted 
Village" by "planting apple trees" in "Merrie England." Is this 
all? "Quoth the Raven, 'Never more.' 

Great Scott! This woman can Shell(y) a few lines to beat the 
Dickens and send them to Mil(ton) before they are Dry (den). But 
we shall not say more for since meeting her we realize that "Life is 
real, life is earnest" and that we "Dare not write as funny as (I) 
we can." 



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JOHN McNEIL 




ANNA LOONEY 




ZORA HARMAN 



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AGNES STRICKLAND 



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ANNUAL 




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(Glass totiittx* 

Muriel McClure President 

Travis Edmonson - Vice President 

Eva Chauncey Secretary 

Flossie Harman - Treasurer 

Colors — Lavender and White. 
Motto — Nil Desparandum. 



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Travis Edmonson 

V. President 

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Flossie Harman 

Treasurer 
Lovey Eyes 



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Muriel McClure 

President 

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Eva Chauncey 

Secretary 

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Marie McLemore 

Representative 

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Alfred McNeil 
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Ueal Killings worth 
Prof. Vonger 




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Opal Baker 
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Jewell Hurst 
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Letha McKenzie 
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=\ Joe Edmonson 


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Zelma McGuire 
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^ is for Alfred who to Art is aspiring 

He draws dav and night with efforts untiring. 



$ is for Smith the giant of the class 

He tried to make an athlete, alas, alas. 

C is for Travis who makes the class roar 

With his fun and mischief and giggles galore. 

& is for Ucal who is after the prize 

Of the girl who has the big loving eyes. 



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3& is for Baker who plays music inspiring 

While Senior boys like angels are choiring. 

<£ is for Chauncey our basket ball girl 

A sensational jumper who plays in a whirl. 

<£ is for Edmonson, the one we call Joe j 

A big hearted fellow with plenty of go. 

3f< is for Flossie with big loving eyes 

One of our Senior boys thinks she's a prize. 

<6 is for Grisham who is very sedate 

So as a teacher I'm sure she'll be great. 

3"! is for Hix who is full of criticism 

But she knows just how to construct a prism. 

3 is for Jewell a good natured child 

Who is always smiling and never gets riled. J j 

% is for Kiilingsworth, by Lera we know her 
A pedagogical miss with admirers galore. 

3L is for Letha an orator great 

Heaver of sighs and believer in fate. 



iH is for McClure and for McLemore too, 
They are the stars of the class it is true, 
But which is the brighter none ever knew. 



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3nuiur Class <&ffitzx$ 



Winnie Tarrant 
A. Ralph McLemore 
Gladys Ham 
Cliff Edwards 



President 

V. President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



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Winnie Tarrant 
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Gladys Ham 
Secretary 



Mark Rogers 





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A. Ralph McLemore 
V. President 



Tom Wright 
Representative 



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John Hamstead 



Erma Cummins 











Doolin Gorman 




Dale Griffin 



















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Cliff Edwards 
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Clifford Farmer 



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To use the words of an old man, who prophesies foreboding- 
evils and events, I just felt it in my bones that something- was 
going to happen to my old midnight haunt, the schoolhouse roof. 
This feeling was intensified when I saw several boys, not especially 
noted for their meaness, nor yet with their names on the model boy 
record, talking in meaning tones, and glancing surreptitously over 
their shoulders toward the schoolhouse. I also remembered that 
they had made a trip to the attic before school time and found that 
those small windows leading to the roof could be opened, a fact 
which seemed to please them very much for they descended smiling 
and one of them said, "Wont those ignominious Freshmen and 
those love-enchanted Juniors be highly exasperated when the light 
of day breaks upon their — well we will wait until morning to 
see the effects." 

When this bombardment was discharged by the conspirator I 
left for my day home in the old oak tree just north of the school- 
house, determined that I would be present with those kids in their 
nightly raid for they would need an old owl's eye if the night was 
exceedingly dark. 

All went well during the day and at night I started out on 
my mission. I was not long locating them for I discovered one 
that led me to the rest of the bunch. My, I sure did have to ram- 
ble some for thev borrowed some horses back of the store buildings 
and flew — yes that expresses it, to a particular farm where there 
was an old haystack and there they all brought forth a whole store 
of second hand clothes, which they began stuffing with hay. This 
work was soon completed and back they started, but here was 
some difficulty. I suppose the horses were angry at having stood 



















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U so long tied, anyway every time they started, the dummy, (for U 

that was what they had made at the haystack), began kicking the 
horse in the flank and they began running. At this rate they 
were not long making it back to the schoolhouse. 

Now I wondered what they would do, but I have learned never 
to ask questions, so I just flew to the old oak tree and awaited the 
results. 

The boys worked patiently with a stick at a window until they 
succeeded in opening it. Then they whispered and laughed, and 
whispered some more, and three or four went in and three stayed 
on the outside. Those that stayed on the outside were nervous 
because I heard one say, "Professor Andrew has not gone home 
from town yet and Professor Smith will be sure to hear this noise 
we are making. Ever since the note books were stolen he always 
looks toward the school house every time he has an idea that he 
hears an unusual noise." 

Just at this time the dormer window opened and three boys 
crawled out on the roof. As they crawled up toward that piece of 
architecture known as the "Lovers Tub," I could see their forms 
outlined against the sky. One had a head of very curly hair while 
another was exceedingly tall and slim. I could not see the third 
but pretty soon one of the boys dropped his shoe off the roof, for 
they had taken their shoes off when they reached the roof, and a 
boy they called Cobb said, "I will bet that was Slocum's shoe for 
none other would make such noise. 

By this time the boys had dragged the dummies to the Lovers 
Tub and tied them, laughing all the while. All at once some one 
whistled very soft and they were all very quiet. I wondered what 
had caussd this when I saw an old man coming up the street to- 
ward the schoolhouse. As he turned the corner he made a funny 
noise and I knew that he had discharged a volley of tobacco juice 
in the direction of where one of the boys was hiding. 

I suppose that it was accidental but the boys laughed very 
much over the fact that one of their number had been lying in that 
identical spot. 

The old man had hardly gone when one of the crowd jumped 
=j from the schoolhouse window to the ground. Immediately two [^ 

boys lying under a tree near by jumped to their feet and left as 
quickly as possible. The boy, who had come thru the window, 




















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U] began laughing- and called them back declaring that he had never 
seen them make a better hundred yard dash even when they had 
been practising for track meet. 

Then all came from the schoolhouse and looked at their work. 
I did not know what was so funny about it but the next morning 
the boys and girls that they call Freshmen were very angry at 



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seeing a large Freshman hanging in effigy from the corner of the 
schoolhouse. It was also evident that those two figures labeled 
"Junior Lovers" suggested some very funny things to some of 
the students. Mc. '15. 





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One day having- grown tired of studying, I went out for a stroll 
to refresh my mind. I headed for a tract of timber near the school 
house and was soon strolling about among the trees. 

As I was walking along I suddenly came upon an old man lying 

□ fast asleep in a shady spot underneath a large tree. This old man n 

wore a long beard and was dressed in a garb totally strange to me, LI 

while by his side lay a long scythe which he had evidently been 
whetting when he fell asleep. I saw that I had surprised old 
Father Time himself, who having grown tired of keeping track of 

□ the commencement preparations of W. G. H. S. had decided to 

take a nap in order that he might be more serviceable to those LI 

pupils who were using him so relentlessly. 

Here was an opportunity not to be cast aside. For lying by the 
side of the old man along with his scythe was a large journal in which 
he kept a record of his loss and gain. With great care therefore n 

I tiptoed to the book and, securing it, retired to the shade of LI 

another tree where I could read it without fear of awaking the old 
man. 

In this book I saw several things but that which interested me 
most was the future career of the Junior class of the W. G. H. S. 

Ralph McLemore after serving a short apprenticeship in his j 

father's bank, began to look for a wider field for his genius and 
became the president of a new Continental Banking System of 
which he was the originator. 

Gladys Ham became known for her efficiency as a skilled musician 
and was renowned over a large district as the best pianist in the j j 

n country. ^ 

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U Tom Wright devoted himself to the world of sport, became a 

past master in the art of baseball and was manager of a team of 
his own which several times won the world's championship. 

Erma Cummins started early in life in the walks of pedagogy 
and later became one of the able instructors of Vassar college. 

Gervais Smith after diligent study and application became a 
| doctor and the leading specialist of New York City. 

Winnie Tarrant also became a teacher and for a long time was a 
teacher at Vassar with Erma Cummins. 

Mark Rogers still worked on the farm but by using the know- 
ledge gained at W. G. H. S. he became the best farmer in the 
country near his home. 

Blanche Gorman and Cliff Edwards both married soon after 
leaving school, one becoming the wife of a noted composer and the 
other marrying a famous minister. 

Dale Griffin was also a devotee to the world of sport and spent 
his time in arduous practice for the Olympian Games in which he 
often excelled. 

Doolin Gorman left for Texas where he met Caruso from whom 
he took singing lessons and whom he later succeeded as a superior 
genius. 

John Tarrant became a noted divine and spent most of his life 
working among the heathen of the Cannibal Islands. 

Clifford Farmer and John Hamstead formed a partnership and 
started a magazine which became one of the most successful pub- 
lications of the day. 

These being the last members of the Junior class and fearing to 
tarry longer lest the aged father should awake, I carefully closed 
and returned the book and then made my way back to the school 
house puzzling over what I had just read. 



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^§ixttkxtmxiT2 Class ©ffters 



Gordon McClure 
Velma Smith 
Tina Grisham 
Zelma Holmes 



President 

V. President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



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Velma Smith 

V. President 

Watching- for the 

delivery boy. 



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Zelma Holmes 

Treasurer 

Talking and talking 

some more. 



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Gordon McClure 

President 

Delivering groceries 

in the east end of 

town. 



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Tina Grisham 

Secretary 

Invading the library. 



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Gladys Rice 
Trying to discrim- 
inate between 
"Spearmint" and 

"'Yucatan." . 



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Ernest Huffman 



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Murray Davis 
Cob fighting. 



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Ollie Bloomer 
Meditating on the 
glories of an edu- 
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Mary Holmes 

Bossing the 

family. 





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Webster Anderson 
Reading- the Lexi- 
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Nellie McNeil 
Too busy to have a 
pastime. 



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Ora Miller 
Meditating- on the 
truth, "Silence is 



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Opal Looney 
Imparting informa- 
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Leonard Osborne 

Trying to be 

good(?) 



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It is one or the strange things in our lives what interesting 
tricks our memory plays us. 

One evening as I sat gazing into the cheery firelight of my cozy 
living room, with my mind drenched in reveries and pleasant mem- 
ories of two and a half score years ago, I chanced to pick up a 
much cherished book of all books, my High School "Annuary" of 
1915, and involuntarily I began turning thru its pages. As I read 
its contents and looked again into the faces of my beloved school 
fellows, I began to read over the lives and recall the peculiarities 
and characteristics of each of my classmates. 

The first familiar face that appeared before me was Opal Looney, 
and I could see from her sweet, innocent face the same generous, 
care-free slip of a girl of twenty years ago, full of life and always 
ready to befriend everyone. Opal had a wide circle of friends. 
Not only friends but chums she had by the score and as Opal 
naturally possessed the qualifications of a newspaper reporter, she 
constantly had a string of anxious girls about her ready to absorb 
any information she might impart to them. 

Next came Webster Anderson whose face recalled to me the firm, 
serious, deep thinking, boy of our Sophomore year. Many stren- 
ous and nerve wracking problems came before us but the clouds of 
discouragement broke away when this great expounder came to the 
rescue. So extensive was his vocabulary that we were compelled to 
hie away for our lexicon after a brief talk with Webster. 

"Valuable goods are very often done up in small packages," is a 
very wise old saying and may be aptly applied to Tot Holmes, whose 
face next appeared before me; the smallest in stature but not in 



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HJ mentality. Since music was her talent, the Sophomore class could 
boast of at least one musician. Miss Mary's lessons were always 
carefully prepared and if she succeeded in after life as in schooldays, 
her life was surely a success. 

Ollie Bloomer leader of the Sophomore class, won this distin- 
guished place by her literary ability and her love for books. At any 
time during- school hours, if you chanced to look about you, there 
sat Ollie devouring a book. When the lessons were hard and other 
members of the class came up with tasks unprepared, Ollie could 
always be depended upon by our teachers. 

Turning again the pages, I beheld the image of Gordon Mc- 
Clure, the expert basketball player, who carried off numerous 
honors during his Sophomore year and who often entertained 
great crowds of people by his masterly ability to shoot baskets at 
the critical m >ment. Weil do I remember th^ various basket ball 
games where "Gordy" was hailed victor, far and wide. Not only 
in basket ball was he recognized as a leader but in many other 
sports which afforded amusement at that time. 

As I beheld the faces of Ernest Huffman and Leonard Osborne 
I wondered what the Sophomore year at Walnut Grove would 
have been if it had not been for the mischievious and funloving dis- 
position of these two boys. Little did they care when Professor 
Andrew gave them a severe scolding for molesting some studious 
soul, or laughing during the recitation period. They never were 
known to take anything seriously in schooldays and often I ponder 
whether life has been as light and gay for them since. 

Velma Smith was noted for her beauty and even her girl class- 
mates admitted this fact. Always she was the same sweet modest 
girl, beloved by everyone (especially Gordy.) 

Nellie McNeil's face brought recollections of her studious nature 
and her sunny disposition. Nellie was very active in athletics and 
won many praises for her ability in this work. 

Murray Davis was the only farmer our class was fortunate 
enough to possess, and he always took a deep interest in Agricul- 
ture. He could solve the most difficult problems and the class 
looked to Murray for that. Although he was slow he was sure and 
always stopped to think before he made a leap. In the latter part 
of our Sophomore year, Murray's old nickname of "Mercury" was 
changed to "Cobb," because of the ability he displayed in a cob 

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fight with Ernest Huffman. 

My gaze then fell upon Gladys Rice, the natural born artist; 
looking - at her beautiful eyes her mass of lovely hair, and smiling 
face, one could hardly judge her anything but an artist. And so 
it was in her Sophomore year when the notebooks had to be filled 
with drawings Gladys excelled all others. Her pleasant face and 
cheery disposition won her many friends. 

As I looked into the face of Zelma Holmes I remembered the 
days of the Sophomore year when lessons were forgotten and all 
else in a jolly time. Zelma never worried about her lessons and 
spent most of her time watching the redhaired, freckle faced, 
Junior lad. 

Then appeared to me the face of Tina Grisham, the last but 
not least. At any time you chanced to peep into the Library, 
there stood Tina absorbed in some M. and M. History. 

Ora Miller. 



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Daisy Lemmnn 
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Clyde Smith 
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Harry Warren 
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Once at midnight, all reclining - , 

Professor Smith, a light most shining, 

Of the W. G. H. S., 

In his chamber lay ignoring 

The sound of his own snoring 

As with slumber he was blessed. 

He was seated in his armchair, all reposing, 

As he chanced to thus be dozing, 

And around him lay his books on every side. 

There were volumes of learned lore 

Piled six deep upon the floor 

And lying on the table three rows wide. 



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Then to his slumbering solitude j 

Came a vision harsh and rude, 

Such as Smith had never seen before. 

Through the room there rushed a sighing 

As of wicked souls a dying, 

And a ghost came right up thru the floor. 

Followed sound most wild and ringing 

Like the chant of demons singing 

As their victims roasted are and flayed. 

With gleaming eyes the vision cried T| 

And his roaring tones made Smith decide: 

"Look at thyself," and tiembling Smith obeyed. 

Round the room through the gloom 

□ Crawling worms began to loom n 

And fell upon the books lying near. - 

Through the pages of the sages 
Crept the worms with their rages 
And ate the books that Smith held dear. 

A worm raised its head and Smith gave a groan. 

He saw by the light the worm's face was his own. 

Slowly he rose and began to affirm: 

"All too late I see what I have lacked, 

This is exact without straying from fact, 

For I am only a book-eating worm." ; ; 



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One day at noon a stranger entered the Walnut Grove High 
School building. This man was, from all appearances, an English- 
man, for his dress and manner did not betoken a native American. 
He was nervous and probably being a little excited he kept con- 
tinually glancing about him as if seeking some one, yet dreading to 
see them. 

The Englishman first stopped in the hallway after entering the 
building but the noise of the grade pupils here seemed to annoy 
him and he began to ascend the stairs to the rooms of the High 
School. He walked across the upper hall until he came to the 
Professor's room and all the time he was looking swiftly about him 
searching every face. 

At the moment the Englishman appeared in the door of the 
room the Professor was busy grading some notebooks that lay 
piled on the desk before him; and he did not look up. He was 
interrupted in his work by the sound of a voice saying, "Pardon 
me but this is Professor Andrew; is it not?" 

Receiving a reply in the affirmative, the stranger introduced him- 
self. "I am Professor Rodgers of the Woodland Business College. 
I am making a tour of all the classified High Schools in Southwest 
Missouri in the interest of my college. I want to give before the 
pupils of these schools a practical demonstration of what may be 
accomplished in ours. And I would like to give a lecture to the 
pupils of your school this evening if you can spare me the time." 

This request had been delivered in a nervous, explosive fashion 
and it was a full half minute before Andrew could reply. As he 
was about to do so there was a noise in the hall and a second 
stranger appeared in the door of the room. He was also evidently 



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a foreigner, being a tall, heavy, fellow with iron-gray mustache and k 

hair and eyes shadowy and dark lit up by gleams like smoldering 
fires. 

At the sight of this newcomer Professor Rodgers turned pale 
and grasped the desk before him to keep from falling. He was 
terribly frightened. With a quick movement of his hand he drew 
a paper from his inside coat pocket and clutched it fiercely while he | j 

looked defiance toward the man in the door. 

Professor Andrew did not notice this and rising he walked across 
the room to interview the second man. In this short moment 
Professor Rodgers seeing that he was unnoticed glanced about 
him for some means of escape from the room. As he did so he 
noticed an overcoat lying on the desk before him. Stooping he 
thrust the paper he held in his hand into a pocket of the coat. 
Then Prof. Andrew, having finished his conference with the second 
man, turned again to Mr. Rodgers. 

That evening, Rodgers gave a demonstrative lecture on the 
mathematical facilities of the Woodland Business College to a 
congregation of students in the Assembly Hall. It was given in 
the rapid, jerky manner of a man who was laboring under some 
great nervous strain. 

The library of the W. G. H. S. is in the rear of the Assembly 
Hall. After the lecture when all had gone and the room was quiet, 
a shade of a window in the library suddenly stirred and from be- 
hind it stepped a tall, heavy looking man with iron-gray mustache 
and hair. Just then, Uncle Billy, the janitor, was heard coming 
up the stairs to lock the doors for the night and the tall man fled 
down an opposite flight of steps and left the building, unseen. 

It was night, dark and gloomy. After the sun had disappeared, 
clouds, dull gray, heavy and somber gathered swiftly along the 
lifeless sky of the north and threatened a night of storm and rain. 
A wind of fitful gusts sprang up, mourning of the lost souls of 
the dead as it swept along. It was a night such as thieves, vag- \ ! 

abonds and evil-doers delight in. 

Along a back alley near the school house, at midnight crept 
three men. They all stooped and hurried along as if pursued by a 
phantom. The man in front carried a bundle over his shoulder, 
while the other two carried a ladder between them. Straight to | 

the building they hurried. Here they first tried all the doors but frf 

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finding- them locked, they gathered in a group beneath the bell 
tower and began to consult each other. 

After a few moments they again appeared and, raising the lad- 
der, they placed it at one of the windows of the upper story and 
the man with the bundle ran up the ladder, while the other two 
remained below. 

Arriving at the top, the man opened the bundle and brought 
forth a short, rounded contrivance which was fashioned like a piece 
of piping. He turned this toward the window in front of him and 
soon a light began to glow. This light grew stronger and strong- 
er, varying in color as it increased in intensity. It became so bright 
that the man was forced to turn away his head to save his eyes. 
Bv the light you could see that his mustache and hair was iron- 
gray. Then the glass began to crumple with the heat and the 
pane of the window burned away until nothing was left. Seeing 
this, the man shut off the light of the tube and reaching through 
the hole, he released the fastening. Raising the window, he 
stepped inside. Here he replaced the tube in the bundle and drew 
forth a piece of glass which accurately fitted the broken pane in 
the window. After this was replaced, it could not be told that 
the window had ever been tampered with. 

Just at midnight Professor Andrew issued from a store 
down town where he had been attending a meeting of the board 
of directors and started to return home. As he emerged from 
the shelter of the awnings over the sidewalk, a chilly wind began 
to blow on him and he shivered. He was wishing for his overcoat 
when he chanced to remember that he had left it lying on his desk 
at the school house. As it would not be out of his way, he de- 
cided to go by and get it. 

The school house was dark and deserted yet Proff. was not 
afraid. Although he was not a timorous man, he would have 
sworn that as he was ascending the stairs to his room, he heard 
something fall outside and the sound of men running swiftly 
away. Going to his room, he walked to his desk and struck a 
match. The desk was bare and the overcoat was gone. At the 
same instant there was a crashing sound in the basement, followed 
by a faint, muffled cry. With silent steps Professor left the build- 
ing and hurried home. 

The next day Professor made inquiries about his coat, but it 





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did not appear. The morning- of the second day, however, it was 



found on a post in the garden by some of the Freshmen. 







It was a warm, sultry morning of Commencement week in early 
May. The air was oppressive and laden with heaviness, filled 
with strange, unreasonable forebodings. The sun had risen in IM 
a bank of red looking clouds, which had later dispersed, and then, ! 

reforming again, now lay protentiously along the horizon in 
ominous, electrically charged masses. 

The first pupil to enter the W. G. H. S. building that morning 
tried to whistle but the inexplicable atmosphere of the place chilled 
the whistle ere it could develop. p 

On entering the hall, the student noticed Uncle Billy hurrying 
from one radiator to another. The steam seemed to be on a frolic. 
The day was really too warm for any furnace heat and the student 
passed out of the heavy air of the lower rooms to his own, where 
he began to prepare his lessons. 

The room was very quiet and very hot. 

After the lapse of a few moments the student was impressed 
with the quietness of the room. It was something out of the or- 
ordinarv. Even the radiators had grown still. For several 
minutes he listened while there was never a sound. Then there 
was a slamming of doors below, and Uncle Billy ran through the 
hall shouting something in tones of greatest fear. After that 
came the explosion. The floor of the room upheaved like the back 
of a giant animal; the walls swayed and crumbled and the roof 
crackled and broke under the strain. For a moment the entire 
building seemed raised by the power of the steam, then the floor 
sank and the student amid a chaos of books and desks, felt himself 
plunging into a yawning abyss and a white cloud of steam from 
the bursted boiler enveloped all. 

When the student recovered consciousness he was lying on the 
ground in the darkness, he could not tell where, while a man with j 

a cloth was stooping over him, bathing his forehead in water. 

As he became more accustomed to the darkness, the lad saw he 
was in an underground chamber, for the wall were of earth. The 
roof seemed to be a pile of debris over that which had once been 
the opening to the room he was now in. An underground stream 
was running thru one side of his prison and it was from this the 











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man had probably taken the water to revive him. Taking- a good 
look at his companion, he saw that he was a tall lean-looking man 
with iron -gray hair and mustache. He recognized him as the 
stranger who had visited the school at noon, several weeks before. 

"Where am I?" he asked weakly, for his head was throbbing 
and he ached all over. 

"My son," the man answered, "as well as I can tell, you are 
underneath the building of the W. G. H. S., in the bottom of an 
old well that the school house is over. But what has happened 
outside?" 

Rising to his feet the boy replied that the boiler had bursted and 
blown up the school house and he had fallen down thru the 
rent walls to the place where he now was. 

"It was lucky for you that you chanced to strike this well for if 
you had not the rubbish which came piling down over it would 
have crushed you to death." 

"But can we get out?" asked the boy fearing. 

"Sure we can," and he smiled such a weird, horrid grin that the 
boy, still more afraid, cried out again. 

"Who are you? How came you here? Where are we? I don't 
understand. " 

Still smiling the man answered: "Be seated on this rock here 
in the corner and I will tell you I have wanted to talk to some 
one for a long time. It cannot especially interest you but I will 
teH^you the exact story of how I came to be here. I am General 
Von Harlemberg of the German army. At the beginning of the 
present European war, I was serving on the staff of the Kaiser. I 
was present at a meeting of this staff in which it was determined 
to take Gibralter from the English. An English officer who had 
turned traitor a few days before told us that the plans of the 
fortress were in possession of a retired English general who was 
living at Scarborough. There are no other plans in the world, 
for the English guard this place carefully and these are all the 
plans they have ever allowed drawn off. They guard every possible 



means by which an outsider might gain intelligence of the place. 
The Kaiser wished to secure these plans and a German fleet sailed 
to the English coast. Scarborough was shelled. I was on the 
fleet and during the shelling I was landed. I easily passed for an 
Englishman. After landing I began search for this officer. Dis- 



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M covering him I made an attempt to secure the plans but failed. M 

Becoming alarmed for the safety of his prized possessions the 
Englishman fled to London. He discovered that I was following 
him and fled to Canada. I still pursued and he, still fleeing, 
finally entered the United States. You probably remember Prof. 
Rodgers of the Woodland Business College. That was none other 
than the man I was pursuing. The day he was here I saw him i i 

hide the plans in your Professor's overcoat pocket. That night I 
burned a glass out of a window with a tube charged with radium 
and entering, secured the coat. Then I heard someone coming and 
fled to the basement to hide. I rushed into a far corner when I 
stepped on the earth over an old well which the school house had f"| 

been built over and which had never been filled. Dirt had settled J 

on the top and I could not see the cover. This is the well and 
here I have remained ever since. During the day time I keep dirt 
over the top of the cover to the well so that it will not be seen and 

Dat night I go out and get what I can find to eat. I cannot escape i f 

the Englishman for he knows where he lost his plans and is guard- U 

ing ever railroad in the vicinity. He has never been able to locate 
me but he knows I am near the school house somewhere. He has 
men in his hire at every railroad station that would instantly de- 

Dtect me if I should attempt flight. I have been hiding here for 
three months waiting for a chance to escape." U 

As the man ceased talking he pulled a bundle from one corner, 
out of which he took a short, queer looking tube. Then he began 
talking again. "It was probably early morning when the ex- 
plosion took place. You have been insensible all day. I have r 
heard them at work removing the debris above. But I do not L! 
want to be caught here for tonight I am going to make one last 
attempt to get back to Germany with ray prize. Here is the radium 
tube of which I spoke and I am now going to show you how it 
works." 

The boy sat in the corner speechless and watched this strange ] 

man. Turning the tube toward the mass above, a light began to 
glow, shining over their prison. This grew brighter and brighter, 
until both had to cover their eyes to save them from blindness. 
Then the broken desks piled above began to crumble away before 
the light like burnt paper. It was not long until a hole was made 
^ to the clear air above and the man, replacing the tube, crawled up ^ 



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the side of the well and disappeared, leaving- the student half dazed. 
Later he crawled out too. 

The school house was not badly damaged, When the workmen 
came the next morning to begin the repairing they found the boy, 
whom everyone had given up for dead, sitting on the front step 
and wondering how soon he would hear of the fall of Gibraltar. 



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1. KcubeoR sraeS dna llabesab. 

2. Yretsym fo nam a. 

3. TeiluJ. 

4. Etirovaf sapdnarg. 

5. Noitatrilf erofeb noitacude. 

6. Noitacude erofeb noitatrilf. 

7. Edirp sdroldnal eht. 

8. Namhsiri lufhsab eht. 

9. Sraet dna shgis, evol. 

10. Namow yadot — dlihc yadretsey. 

11. Etanracnier eraepsekahS. j 

12. Etirovaf erutuf sapdnarg. 

13. Yretsym eht ni namow eht. 

14. Eh saw nam ythgim. 

15. Tsaisuhtne gnirotom. 

16. Noitanimreted mirg. 

17. Htoot ym, rotcod ho. 

18. Esuac eht. 

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7. Much comment on the new teacher. Guileless Freshmen 
are ushered about by the Faculty. 

8. Look out for the Inspector. 

9. Basket ball is inflated. (Blowed up.) 

10. Seniors are introduced to Bassett. 

11. Walnut Grove dealers order 10,000 gallons of coal oil. 

14. Jewell Hurst falls down stairs — bing! 

15. Tennis team organized. 

16. Max Rice bursts the basket ball — bang! 

17. Avery Smith appears — Freshmen think he is the H. S. 
Inspector. 

18. Rue Wright enters school. Freshmen think school has 
| been hard on Avery. 

21. Results of the Ash Grove tennis games announced. 

22. Athletic Associations are organized. 

23. Holy Moses, the note books. 
| i 24. Harry McMehen and Travis Edmonson go to Ash Grove. 

25. Library rules are announced. 

28. Prof. Andrew's birthday. He finds streamers attached to 
his coat tail. 

29. Base ball team is selected. 

n 30. John T. sings, "O You Beautiful Doll." 

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1. Prof. Smith calls for note books. Prof. Andrew calls for 
note books. Mrs. Andrew calls for note books. Avery Smith 
crashes through recitation chair. Ye gods, what next! 

2. Base ball game with Ash Grove. Great excitement when 
Wilder collides with third baseman. Score Walnut Grove 4,. Ash 
Grove 2. 

3. Much talk about the Ash Grove game. Puzzle — Was 
Wilder hurt? 

4. Basket ball practice begins in earnest. 

5. Faculty spring the Inspector Bugbear again. 

6. Physical Geography class goes on field trip to Gray don 
Springs. 

9. Letha McKenzie makes a face at Joseph Edmonson. 
Joseph faints. 

12. Webster Anderson explains the geotectonics of the polar 
latitudes also makes clear the correlation between seismographic 
movements of the Pleistocene and the hydrostatics of Sac River. 

14. Bolivar vs. Walnut Grove. Disappointment. 

15. Uncle Billy is said to have thought profane language. 

16. The cry, "Beat Fair Play." 

19. We did. Score^ Walnut Grove 39; Fair Play 10. 

20. A foreboding quiet prevails. 

21. The plot revealed. Dummies are found upon the school 
building. 

22. Faculty raise Cain about everything in general, especially 
note books. This harrangue is ended by the unexpected(?) an- 
nouncement that the Inspector may appear at an early date. 

25. Seniors organize. 

26. Mrs. Andrew finds peace offering on desk. Shortly after- 
ward Merle Mc. is discovered devouring said offering. 

27. Sophs defeat the Freshmen. 

28. Freshmen send ultimatum to the Sophomores. Both 







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classes practice until it is too late to see the basket ball. 

29. County Superintendent J. R. Roberts spends a day with us. 

30. Hallowe'en masquerade skating- party. 



2. Basket ball game with Ash Grove. Score— W. G. H. S. 
35; Ash Grove 9. 

3. Max Rice is of the opinion that it will be hard to beat 
Dick's team. 

4. Muriel McClure looks sleepy. Too much Cave Spring. 

5. Students hold their breath while Avery Smith comes out 
for the shot put. 

6. Heated tariff discussions in the economics class. 

9. Morrisville College defeated. Score W. G. H. S. 29; Mor- 
risville 15. 

10. Pack Pitman suggests that Scarritt-Morrisville be changed 
to Scared Morrisville. 

11. The Seniors attempt to imitate Patrick Henry. 

12. Seniors continue, "Give me liberty or give me death." 

13. Letha McKenzie is confined to her home with an attack 
of epizootic. 

14. Clyde Smith tardy. "Had to ketch out the horses for 
pappie. 

17. Examinations announced for Thursday and Friday. 

18. John Tarrant begins to hunt for his books. 

19. Clifford Farmer aspires to be buried in the poets corner of 
Westminster Abbey. 

20. In examination paper Murray Davis discusses the excellent 
fishing in Lake Agassiz. 

23. Freshmen team defeats the Sophomore girls. 

24. John Tarrant loses his books. 

25. The Dormitory girls are quarantined on account of the 



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presence of diphtheria in their midst. 

26. Thanksgiving Day. Walnut Grove High defeats Ozark 
High. Stockton Astonishers are astonished by our Second Team. 
Girls give war dance in center of the court. This was a gala day 
for Walnut Grove. J. S. McLemore highly excited. Uncle Jim 
Kelley highly exasperated. Pack Pitman outrageously infuriated. 
Two dozen Ford cars and an automobile were drawn up on the 
sde line. 



2/ 



Vacation. The above mentioned games are played in every 



store in town. 

30. Juniors begin grammar review. 



JU'riuttJber. 



1. 



Walnut Grove goes to Fair Play. Score W. G. H. S. 22; 



Fair Play 9. 

2. Juniors entertain Seniors. 

3. History outside reading emphasized. Grand results. Sen- 
iors read 16 pages. Freshmen read 1600 pages. 

4. The Count of Cyenpaediaclo visits us. Juniors think he is 
the High School Inspector. Prof. Smith sees thru the masquerade 
of Cyenpaediaclo and humiliates him, begosh. 

7. Manly Heating Company begin installation of the furnace. 
This is a decisive blow to the Itcantbedid Club. 

8. Walnut Grove plays the State Normal and gets the best 
score made against Normal by a high school team. 

10. Latin contest between Juniors and Seniors. Juniors victor- 
ious. Red Hamstead of the Juniors and Mirandy McLemore of 
Seniors are the prize packages. 

11. Republic meets Walnut Grove. Max is convinced that 
Dick's team does not have the wind. Percy abuses "Little 
Gordy." Gordy retaliates. Uncle Jim applauds. Gene Brim 
tangoes on his John B. 

12. First fire in new furnace. Smoke. 

15. Shorty Wright looks at Avery Smith and crashes thru 



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recitation chair. Another evidence that mind controls matter. 

16. A regular old pie supper. Smiley Lamun comes to the 
aid of the Juniors. Winnie Tarrant is elected Queen of the Beau- 
tiful. Prof. Andrew and Freshmen get long wished for set of 
Baileys Cyclopedia of Agriculture. 

17. Sneeze powder is scattered. Avery Smith suffers from 
distemper. Prof. A. makes a speech — no more sneeze powder. 

18. Juncibus Ottoconius pays a tribute to Prof. Smith's 
History and Mrs. A.'s Latin. 

21. Walnut Grove vs. Southwest Baptist College. College 
wins. 

22. Plans for the Christmas tree. 

23. All day examinations. 

24. Christmas tree. Teachers receive gifts from students. 
Skating party given by the Faculty and then the turkey dinner at 
the Cottage Hotel. Hurrah for everybody, especially the Faculty. 

January 

5. Prof. Andrew starts the New Year with one of those grand 
speeches of his. Subject: "New Year Resolutions. 

6. Determination to be good is stamped upon the face of 
students. 

7. The "pop off" valves disturb recitations. 

8. Maxine Rice suffers from "Rook Fever." Dr. Andrew 
"pulls him thru." 

9. Heard from the faculty— "All note books must be handed 
in to day. Get busy! Whip up! Do something! Work harder! 
Make hay! For your sake, for our sake, for your parent's sake 
and last but not least for the sake of Walnut Grove High School, 
which some day may be your Alma Mater, procrastinate no 
longer." (Seniors cry but Freshmen are too young to realize the 
meaning of it all.) 

12. Prof. Smith treats the Sophomores and second division of 
n the Freshmen. This came as a reward for excellent class work. 



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M 13. Another chair catastrophe. Rountree McMehen suffers M 

therefrom. 

14. Mrs. A. "Marie, give the principal parts of the verb be 
in Latin." Marie, "Bean — -beanere — beenbeens — -beansoup." 

15. Mercury, Jeff and Footney — nuf said. 

16. Agriculture Class has pen of Buff Orpingtons in the hall. j~| 
Being pleased with the environments of W. G. H. S., the chickens 
start a delightful chorus. Mrs. Andrew and Prof. Smith dash 
to the hall doors to catch a culprit who is imitating chickens. 

19. Track athletes start training. 

21. Erasers mysteriously disappear. jj 

22. Mrs. Andrew's birthday. Students surprise her as she 
sits "pedes ante ignem." 

23. Parent-Teacher Association organized. 

26. ENTHUSIASM. jj 

27. John Tarrant loses his books. (Laying all forgetfulness 
aside John is a good chap,) 

28. T. Marion Crawford, the impersonator, gives "Peaceful 
n Valley." Sophomores win in the ticket selling contest. n 

29. Extraordinary good lessons in all classes. 



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1. Ominous whisperings, "Smallpox abroad in the land." 

2. "Have you been vaccinated? 

3. Alfred McNeil "breaks out" in the barber shop. 

4. Dame Rumor does a great business. Smallpox! Smallpox! 
Smallpox! n 

5. Joe Edmonson has smallpox. Ditto Allen. Doctors order 
more viris. Latin "phenoms" give portrayal of school life in the 
days of Cicero. All honor to our friend, John Hamstead. 

8. Junior girls shed tears over their geometry grades. 

9. Ernest Huffman and Winnie Tarrant have controversy ! J 
n in Physical Geography class. Ernest is intimidated. ^ 

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10. Murray Davis establishes worlds record as a cob thrower. 

11. Annuary staff is elected. 

12. Freshman do not understand the Annual movement and 
ask if it is a Senior study. 

13. Prof. John B. Boyd of Missouri University visits the 
"study house." 

16. Prof. I. Besum Rogers makes a speech before the student 
body. 

17. Murray brings a new window pane. 

19. Prof. Roberts makes an interesting speeeh before the stud- 
ent body. His original poem, "The Barefoot Girl" makes a hit. 
Dr. McClure makes a splendid talk on cleanliness. 



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1. Students take long breath and start on the final sprint. 

2. Tuition students are warned to remit lest they be visitors 
Monday. 

3. President Fisher, of Bolivar College, gives us an excellent 
talk on the value of an education. 

4. Opal Looney falls up stairs. 

5. Mr. Morgan, the Annuary photographer, makes his third 
visit. The boys roast him about that little black cap. 

8. Snow bound. 

9. Snow bound. 

10. Stop! Look! Listen! The High School Inspector! 
After all he looks just like a human being. 

11. Quiet nerves. 

12- Parent-Teacher meeting. Prof. Smith makes, as he calls 
it, an extemperunious speech. Loud applause. 

15. Alfred McNeil plays hookey. 

16. Ora Miller stars in recitation and is congratulated by 
pupils and teacher. 

17. Track team works hard after school. Dale jumps 20 feet 



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and 3 inches. Gordon and Tom also show some class. 

18. Agriculture class cleans up the garden. Egg producing 
rations are prepared for the Orpingtons. 

19. Five eggs are found in a pen containing 4 hens. Puzzle: 
Who was the guilty party? 

22. Prof. Smith and Mary Holmes fall thru same chair. Not 
at the same time. 

23. John Tarrant cartoons his own class as donkeys. 

24. Muriel McClure throws the discus 95 feet. 

25. Mr. Morgan here on last trip. 

26. All the Annuaries are sold. 

29. Seniors begin contest for places in Dramatic Club. 

30. Professor Andrew holds meeting of the track athletes. 

31. Seniors having pedagogical aspirations much delighted 
over returns from teachers examinations. 

April 

April Fool. 

Edna Baker recites entire recitation period on one history 

Lester Osborne visits school. Wonder why? 

School meeting. 

Seniors all gone. Where? After schools. 

Hair pulling contest. All honors to Professor Smith. 

9. Day of rest for the track athletes. Greene county track 
meet tomorrow. 

12. Walnut Grove gains second place in the meet. 

13. Agitation begun for digging out the basement. 

14. Mrs. Andrew surrenders English class to Prof. A. Study 
of Hamlet begun. 

15. Music fiend creates harmony in the basement by playing on 
the radiator pipes with a shovel. 



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16. Travis Edmonson gives up Hamlet as a bad job. 

19. Agriculture class begins to watch growth of garden seeds. 

20. Work begun on completion of school house walk. 

21. Dale Griffin sprains his ankle in track practice. 

22. Rountree McMehen leaves school for a flying trip to the 
Mexican border. 

23. Close of the grade schools. Entertainment at Opera House. 

26. Deathly silence in the rooms down stairs. 

27. Seniors have first practice of their play. , 

28. Professor Smith makes final call for notebooks. To be 
handed in Friday. 

29. Travis Edmonson and Alfred McNeil make final trip to 
Ash Grove. Hard luck. 

30. Sophomore class goes on field trip to Wishart. Report 
much knowledge gained and much sport enjoyed. 







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3. Final meeting of the Annual Board. 

4. Clyde Smith performs during History class. Falls on his 
back while reciting. 

5. Juniors break record for outside history readings so far. 

6. Gravel road to be built to the school house. 

7. Work' in the basement. 

10. Professor Smith cannot locate strange noises coming from 
somewhere in the Junior class. 

11. Review of the last quarter begun. 

12. Alfred McNeil develops artistic ability during history and 
receives severe reproof. 

13. There is nothing new under the sun. 

If. Freshmen are made to wonder if they will ever be Sopho- 
mores. 

17. Final examinations begun. Much distress. 



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18. Seats on sale for Commencement. 

19. Seniors give final rehearsal of their play. 

20. The end of study. 

21. Commencement. That's all. 















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I think I know my history well 
For I have studied day and night, 

So now just listen while I tell 

And then vou will see if I am rigfht. 



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We have studied from first to last, 
Just how Columbus made the charge 

And by the sleeping watchmen passed, 
Across the Delaware on a barge. 



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It was in sixteen ninety two 
When on a frosty Xmas night, 

He showed to us what he could do 
And Trenton took without a fight. 



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Then at the famous Bunker Hill 
There where the noble Lincoln fell, 

We see the daring charge, now still 
Hearing Sherman say "War is hell." 

Again our friend Stonewall we see, 

As daring, brave, he stood his ground, 

A very noble man was he, 

Though dead at Bull Run he was found. 

And well I know the Presidents too, 
From Washington to Wooden-head 

And among them there is quite a few 
But best of all of them is Ted. 

Though this is all I tell you now 
You can see that I am not a fool 

I know a lot I would allow 

And I have learned it all in school. 



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The Basket Ball career which the W. G. H. S. began in the 
term of 13-11, has been continued this year with even greater 
success. The team has played almost all of the fast High School 
teams in Southwest Missouri and is proud of the fact that they 
obtained a greater number of scores from the Springfield State 
Norm il than any other High School t^am. 

The forwards for the team were Osborne and G. McClure. 
"Little Mac" was right there on sliding the ball to his men. The 
visiting teams were handicapped very much by his elusiveness and 
ability to go by where the average player would have stopped. 

Osborne was very much at home under the goal and often 
saved the team from defeat by his skill in shooting baskets. 

The guards were Wright and Edmonson . While Wright was not 
noticeable as a fast player, he did excel in guarding his man. Ed- 
monson did not make "grand stand" plays but always managed 
to be in the right place at the right time. 

The center man was Griffin, who played a fast, strong game, 
being noted for his team work and cool headedness. 

Several of the substitutes have shown ability. Among them 
McLemore and L. Osborne who will probably fill the place of the 
two Seniors of the team. 



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W. G. H. S. - 25 Bolivar High - - 28 

W. G. H. S. - 12 Bolivar High - - 15 I J 

W. G. H. S. - - 27 Everton - - 28 

W. G. H. S. - - 29 Springfield Normal - 66 

W. G. H. S. - - 13 S. W. B. College - 38 

W. G. H. S. - - 35 Ozark High - - 10 

W. G. H. S. - - 35 Ash Grove - - 9 

W. G. H. S. - - 21 Fair Play - - 9 

W. G. H. S. - . 39 Fair Play - - 10 

W. G. H. S. - - 23 Republic - - 11 



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DALE GRIFFIN 

CAPTAIN 
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TRAVIS EDMONSON 

LEFT GUARD 



TOM WRIGHT 

EIGHT GUARD 




























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RALPH McLEMORE 

LEFT FORWARD 



GORDON McCLURE 

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MURIEL MeCLURE 

FORWARD 



REU WRIGHT 

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The Track season this year has been a disappointment. The 
Walnut Grove team participated in two meets, the Greene county 
and the Southwest Missouri. 

The best showing- was made by the team in the Greene county 
meet. Walnut Grove gained second place, taking 37 points, while 
Ash Grove took first with 46 points. 

Greater things were expected of the team in the Southwest 
Missouri meet but at the last practice Griffin, our star man, 
sprained his ankle and was unable to compete. With the loss of 
their captain and best athlete, the team gave up hope and failed to 
make much of a showing in the last contest. 



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Tom Wright 




Dale Griffin 



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Ralph McLemcre 



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Gervais Smith 




John Tarrant 



Clifford Farmer 



Gordon McClure 



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Len Osborne 




Clyde Smith 



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For the first time in its history W. G. H. S. has had a Tennis j 1 

Team. Only one Tournament was held. This being with Ash 
Grove when R. McLemore and T. Wright of W. G. met Short 
and McKenzie of A. G. and R. Wright and Osborne of W. G. met 
Comegys and Dalby of A. G. The former W. G. team was 
victorious but the latter was defeated, leaving the match a draw j j 

which was never settled. A match was set for a later day but A. 
G. was unable to play on that day for some, cause, which we very 
much regret. The '15- '16 team promises to be a good one and 
some good matches are looked forward to. 

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Who Are Our 



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Friends? 



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Are those people not our friends who 
cooperate to make an enterprise in which 
we are interested, a success? 

The Annuary is a Walnut Grove High 
School enterprise. 

The advertisers represented in this book 
have cooperated to make this enterprise a 
|J success. jj 

Therefore, first, last and all the time 

Patronize Our Advertisers 

We are grateful to our advertisers for their 
cooperation, and we bespeak for them the 
patronage of our fellows and the success 
they merit. 

Sincerely, 

THE ANNUARY STAFF. 



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mi patronage of our fellows and the success FT 

U thev merit. M 



1 1 

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EMINENTLY SATISFACTORY 

THAT'S THE BEST WE CAN SAY FOR OUR 

SPRING CLOTHES 



You cannot find Col- 
legian Clothes in 
every shop in town. 
The manufacturers 
are as careful in se 
lecting their repre- 

'-' sentatives as they are 
in producing exactly 
the correct style and 
embod.ving the ripest 

HI quality. 



COLLEGIAN 

CLOTHES 

are certain to satisfy 
you from the stand- 
point of style and 
service Human in- 
genuity cannot ac 
cumplish a more 
pleasing result. Even 
so trifling an item 
as the thread has 
been carefully chosen 
So you may know 
that the fabric and 
every detail embodied 
in a suit is of the 
most dependable 
type The style is 
above criticism But, 
judge for yourself- 
































JONES BROS. 

WALNUT GROVE. MO- 1 

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SENIOR ENGLISH. 



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Mrs. A., "Was Lowell really 
a minister to Spain?" 

Travis E., "I didn't know 
he was a preacher. ' ' 





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THE PLACE TO EAT AND 
BUY THINGS TO EAT 



We sell bread of Ash Grove 
baking. 

ALL KINDS NUTS AND 
FRUITS. 

Oranges, Bananas, Lemons, 
Sandwiches, Coffee, Milk and 
Home- baked Pies. We use 
Heinz Mince Meat, Catsup, 
Mustard and Pickles. 

TOBACCO, CIGARS AND 
FINE CANDIES. 

Let us serve you with Short 
Orders. 

CITY RESTAURANT, 

W. D. Fitch, Propr. 



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PITMAN'S PHARMACY 



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PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY 

DRUGS AND DRUGGIST'S 

SUNDRIES. 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO 



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ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 



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Savings Habit, 
account with 



Did it ever occur to you why all 
good business men keep a checking 
account with a bank? We'll tell 
you. It enables them to keep their 
funds in a more secure place than 
the office safe. It gives them a 
better standing in the business 
world. It enables them to pay their 
bills by check, the returned check 
being an undisputable receipt. 

Individuals find a checking 
account very convenient and a 
source of saving. Money in one's 
pocket is often spent on the spur of 
the moment, while one is disposed 
to think twice before drawing on 
his balance in the bank. Get the 
Lay up for a rainy day. Start a bank 



"The Old Reliable 
BANK OF WALNVT GROVE 



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1. Tom Wright 2. John Hamstead 



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Walnut Grove Lumber 
and Silo Co. 







Retail Dealers in 

Lviinber, Cement ^nd CoaJ 



Wholesale Dealers in 







Silos a.nd Silo Material 







J S. Whitaker, Mgr. 

WaJrtut Grove, Mo. 



















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3. Zelma Holmes 4. Gordon McClure 



5. Marie McLemore 
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Oldest and Best 



With our many years ex- 
Hl perience we have learned the 
"ifs" and 44 ands" of the 



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GROCERY BUSINESS 

and are now perfectly able to 
give you satisfaction in any- 
thing in our line. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR 
PATRONAGE. 

D. L Bradshaw. 



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7, Muriel McClure 
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Boost the School 

and 

Preserve Your 
Teeth. 

B F CANTRELL, D. D. S. 



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6. Travis Edmonson 
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^rnfEsenr ^"utith's 3ftbilcisnphg 



HJ Before marriage it is Honk! 
Honk! Five Dollars! After 
marriage it is Ding — Ding — 

Nickel! 



All that General Grant 
needed to be content was an 
old ragged union suit. 







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Athens Candy Co., 



Wholesale and Retail 



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J Springfield, Mo. U 



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UPHAM 

SHOE 
COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS 
AND JOBBERS OF" 



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BOOTS, SHOES. AND 
RUBBERS. 



418-420 SOUTH STREET, 





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S PR IN(}FTELU. MO. 

G- B. REED, 

GENERAL SALESMAN. 



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Mrs. A., in Junior English, 
"How is the best way to avoid 
ambiguous use of nouns and 
pronouns in a sentence?" 

John T., "Write a sentence 
without any nouns or pro- 
nouns." 



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O. H. HAMSTEAD 

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HATS AND SHOES, THE BEST FOR WEAR. 

D CLOTHING ° 

THE BEST WITHOUT COSTING MORE. 

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_ 7 WASHINGTON STREET, WALNUT GROVE, MO. [1 

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We do cleaning, 



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Jj IRST _ OI^^VSk^ pressing, dying. 

rT - 1 I rank B. Smith 

TONSORIAL Laundry Co. 

-— - -w--»- Home of the Purple Bo*. 

Work 

the new barber shop. 

Home of clean totfels and hot tfater. 











A G. EDMONSON. Propr. 

WALNUT GROVE, MO. \\ 

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8. Paul McLemore 



10. Ophia Bloomer 



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oisei^ ^hiibh 



IV. jr. Jones&~Son 



FURNITURE 

CARPETS 
AND 

WALL PAPER 



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Flour 
Feed 



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And all 
Grist /V\ill 



Products 



Where? 



Smith (Si Fisher 

WE ALSO BUY WHEAT, 



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Cottage Hotel 


Mrs. L. B. Perry, Prop'r. 


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JOHN D ROCKEFELLER 

Dealer in 

COAL OIL... 



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ra J. A. Brim G. A. Brim Q. E. Brim 







































J* A. Brim & Sons 

Ford Agents 











Hardware, Groceries, Implements 
and Buggies, Undertaker's Goods. 



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Ford Parts, Accessories, etc, 
Goodyear, Pennsylvania^ and 
Ajax Tires . . 

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SYLVIA MILLING COPf 

SYLVIA.KANSAS ■'^ 



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43L"bs NORTH poLE HQQR 



NORTH POLE 
HARD WHEAT 

FLOUR 

WE ARE THE EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 







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ALSO CARRY 











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COMPLETE STOCK OF 

STAPLE AND FANCY 

GROCERIES 







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SOFT AND HARD WHEAT FLOUK8, 
FEED AND MICHIGAN SALT 







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If you are not one of our regular customers 
vOe Would be pleased to number you on our 
satisfied list. 

C. COMBS 

WALNUT GROVE, MO 







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WHEN IN NEED OF 

Shelf or HeaOy 

1 HARDWARE " 

Implements, Buggies, StoVes, Tintfare, 
Cutlery, Cream Separators, Paint, Oil or 
Glass, see 

| HURST & WHEELER, | 

| WALNUT GROVE, MO. | 

/gi[5]f5i f r==n ii u p n iaifaiB n n n m^^si igiinifo 

H H 

A COLLEGE COURSE WILL INCREASE YOUR fl 
CHANCE OF SUCCESS 500 PER CENT. Q 

DRURY COLLEGE WILL DO THIS! 

1. IT IS A STANDARD COLLEGE 

(a) A faculty of 35; 13 buildings; modern laboratories. 

(b) Work fully recognized by all graduates and professional schools. j 

2. THE DRURY SPIRIT IS: 
(a) Christian; (b) Democratic; (c) Cooperative. 

This has made Drury the fastest growing and largest college in 
Missouri and has won state championships in athletics and oratory. 

3. EXPENSES ARE MODERATE 

(a) 37 per cent of our students this year are self-supporting wholly 
or in part. 

(b) Easily accessible. 

For further information write, 

G. W. Nonemacher, Secty. J. G. McMURTRY, President j ] 

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12. Velma Smith 



14. Avery Smith 



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GROCERIES - GROCERIES 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY 

OF 

SHELF GROCERIES 



ALSO CARRY A FULL LINE 
OF FLOUR. FEED AND 



STEER BRAND COFFEES 



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Full Line of 

Heinz' 
Specialties. 








Fresh Fruits 

and 

Vegetables 





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TRADE 



mark: 







ALL ORDERS CAREFULLY FILLED AND 
PROMPTLY DELIVERED. 









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C. M, M c OLURE 

WALNUT GROVE, MO. 



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13. Eva Chauncey 



15. Jewell Hurst 



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16. Ralph McLemore 



17. Gervais Smith 



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Learn it Right... 



= A High School graduate by spending a few months attending the 



Springfeld Business College 

can command a vood salarv. 

What is lie prepared to do without a business education? 

Send ior new catalog 

J. A- Taylor, President. 



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18. Dale Griffin 



19. Winnie Tarrant 







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Does Your Watch 
Keep Time? 

If not, see 

POTEET, 

"King of The MoVhs" 

We also carry a complete 

line of Jertelry and 

Optical Goods. 

Agents for the 
Underwriting Companies. 

Jim, the Jerteler* 

We Guarantee Our V ork. 



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COME VISIT US IN OUR 
NEW BUILDING. 

We are now completely established 
in our new uptodate produce house 
and are prepared to pay you the 
highest market prices for all kinds 
of produce- 

We buy poultry, esrys, hides, 
wool butter, tallow and beeswax 
Don't forget we still buy cream and 
guarantee an accurate test. 

Have a complete line of stock 
remedies and can supply you with 
medicine for everything- from a hen 
to a ho r 

The cream that tests the highest 
is that taken from Beatrice Cream 
Seperators We would be glad to 
install one for you. 

PLEASE CALL ON US 

Walnut Grove Produce Co. 



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SMITH DRUG CO. 

WALNUT GROVE, MO. 



Fresh Drugs 
Pure Drugs 
Patent Medicines 
Toilet Articles 



PRESCRIPTIONS AND FAMILY 
RECIPES A SPECIALTY 



YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

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SUNSHINE CANNED 
VEGETABLES 

With fresh garden flavor, with care and cleanliness in preparation, 
with full weights of contents, selling at favorable prices. Ask for the 
following varieties: 

Sunshine Pumpkin Sunshine Kraut Sunshine Hominy 

Sunshine Kidney Beans Sunshine Swt. Potatoes Sunshine Peas 

SUNSHINE CANNED MEATS 

Delicately prepared, finely seasoned, Each Package Inspected: 
Sunshine Potted Meat, Ham flavor, 
Sunshine Vienna Sausage, 
Sunshine Sliced Beef in Glass. 

CAPSTAN COUNTRY GENTLEMAN CORN 
Many people want a corn a little better in quality than the common 
grades. Capstan is a high grade, Northern grown, Country Gentleman, 
which invariably pleases. 



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PRATT LOW FRUITS 

The choicest of all California fruits, packed fairly ripe, possession of LI 
the fruit flavor as it comes from the orchard. To meet all ideas of price 
it is furnished in three grades: 

Red Letter Roman Gold Yellow Hammer 

When wishing something to give a finishing touch to your meal, order 
any of the following varieties of Pratt Low Fruits, under one of the |] 
three labels: 

Lemon Cling Peaches, Yellow Crawford Peaches 

Royal Anne Cherries, Bartlett Pears 

White Cherries, Apricots, 

Hawaiian Pineapple. I j 

REMEMBER PLEASE the above brands stand for QUALITY 
AND PRICE, and are sold by home institutions and distributors. 

SPRINGFIELD GROCER COMPANY, | 

SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI S 

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ITS YOUR EXPERIENCE 

THAT GIVES US CLOTHES 
KNOWLEDGE 

We claim to know a lot about how 
clothes should be made to give proper 
service. 

We know what we expect to be put 
into the clothes we buy. 
We know what such clothes can be 
expected to give in clothes service. 
But we have to depend upon two 
things to be sure we are getting what 
we expect. One is the integrity of 
the maker. The second is the satis- 
faction the ciothes give you a'ter you 
have worn them a long while. 
Do you think we would keep on 



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featuring 




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OXLEY 8c LOONEY. 



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N 
G" and "WOOLY BOY" Clothes 
for Young Men and Clothes for Boys season after 
season if we were not sure that the makers were giving us satisfying 
clothes? 

DO YOU THINK we'd know these were satisfying clothes unless our 
customers came back season after season and told us so? 
The makers' guarantee helps a lot — but its your satisfaction that backs 
up the makers' guarantee. 



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